Tag Archives: Tim Sass

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

STEM and STEM trained teachers

Tim Sass’ paper “Understanding the STEM Pipeline,” contributes a lot to our understanding of the linkages between K-12 teaching and studying science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields in college. One particular point caught my eye. Sass asks how having … Continue reading

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Predicting future teacher performance: value-added versus principal evaluations

Douglas Harris and Tim Sass use Florida data to ask an awfully important practical question: If you have both teacher value-added numbers and principal evaluations, which does better at predicting future teacher contributions? Do the two methods each have something separate … Continue reading

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Optimistic news on the longer run effects of charter schools

The received wisdom is that there isn’t much difference between charter school performance and the performance of other public schools, with some of the newer evidence being that certain kinds of charters, those following the “no-excuses” model do indeed get … Continue reading

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  1. l hodge says:

    Those that leave a charter after 8th grade would be similar to those that stay? That is a completely unreasonable assumption.

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Ed school VAM

Teachers are central to quality education. Arguably, schools of education are central to quality teachers. The last six months have seen two enormous steps in evaluating schools of education: publication by US News of NCTQ’s rankings of teacher prep programs … Continue reading

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Peer effects

Are students helped by having other smart students as classmates? Answering this question is a surprisingly difficult statistical problem. Suppose schools tend to track students by ability. (Suppose???) When you look at a high-achieving student you’ll see that she tends to … Continue reading

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Quiz on who leaves teaching

Who’s more likely to leave teaching: high quality teachers or teachers who ain’t so good? The answer, quoting from work by Li Feng and Tim Sass based on Florida data, appears below. Take a stab at the answer before you … Continue reading

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Alternative teacher training

In what’s bad news for schools of education, Tim Sass has looked at Florida teachers and compared teachers trained in traditional school of education programs to teachers who come through a variety of alternative certification programs. Bottom line? There’s not much … Continue reading

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  1. sjl says:

    Surely “value-added” is the appropriate metric here as well, but what influence do the background variables in the table have on teacher effectiveness in general?

    • Dick Startz says:

      The general result is that the effect of these background variables is small–or at least hard to detect–although this specific paper doesn’t report on their effect.

      I’m not sure “value-added” is the right metric. If an alternative program could bring in “just-as-good” teachers as a school of education, and do so more cheaply, why would we need teacher training from a school of ed?

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Ed Schools and VAM: Not so easy

People are going to evaluate teache training programs in ed schools–soon. Value-added measures (VAM) of the students of the teachers produced by a given ed school will be one factor in the evaluations–sometimes. Today, a cautionary note from Mihaly, McCaffery, … Continue reading

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