Tag Archives: test scores

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

A more careful look at the Black-White test score gap

What exactly does the “score” on a standardized test tell you? Higher is better, but is 100 twice as good as 50? 10 percent better? Three times better? To get around this conundrum, which economists call “ordinality,” Timothy Bond and Kevin … Continue reading

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More experienced teachers get assigned higher scoring students

One suspects that more experienced teachers get handed easier to teach students. Not always of course, but on average. One mechanism is that more experienced teachers move to districts with higher socioeconomic status teachers, or move to “nicer” schools within … Continue reading

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Test measurement error measurement

Standardized tests all include measurement error. Never mind the hard conceptual questions of what we ought to be testing, standardized tests include error just because of the randomness of which question appears on a particular form and the like. Psychometricians … Continue reading

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Non-Cognitive ability and standardized tests and teachers

Kirabo Jackson reminds us about the importance of non-cognitive ability with a careful statistical analysis. The critical policy issue is that we are increasing the use of student test scores in evaluating teachers. Jackson reminds us that (a) there are … Continue reading

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Measuring test measurement error

Ever just have a bad day? Ever take a test on a bad day? One reason that test scores are imperfect is that scores partially reflect what a kid had for breakfast on test day or whether particularly interesting clouds were floating … Continue reading

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  1. Jesse Rothstein says:

    Do you have a link to the paper? I’d be interested to see it.

    In the North Carolina data, I worked out a few years ago that the published reliability for the test scores implied that gain scores had reliability around 0.2. If the published reliability is too high, gain scores are even less reliable than that.

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Test scores and intervention fadeout

Elizabeth Cascio and Douglas Staiger take a fresh look at what we think we know about the timing of educational interventions and show that part of what we think we know is due to arbitrary scaling of test scores. Cascio … Continue reading

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Test score gaps revisited

Note to readers: This is problems with test score measurement week at ProfitOfEd.org. Timothy Bond and Kevin Lang have a new paper with really scary results for folks using test scores for both policy and research. Scary, and maybe very deep. … Continue reading

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Which test measures what?

Standardized tests scores of each teacher’s students play an increasing role in evaluation… of everything in sight. Good up to a point. Critics argue that standardized test scores measure learning along a too narrow axis. Psychologists Angela L. Duckworth, Patrick D. Quinn, and Eli … Continue reading

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Education and inequality – a vicious circle

We all know that differences in education lead to big differences in income. A recent New York Times article by Sabrina Tavernise argues that differences in income lead to differences in educational outcomes. That’s always been true, but what Tavernise argues is … Continue reading

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West Virginia forging ahead?

On Monday I wrote that West Virginia is on to something in trying to emulate Finland, but that it won’t succeed by just saying teachers need to be honored. Teachers need to be paid well first. Then they need to be … Continue reading

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