Tag Archives: tenure

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Tenure

I strongly favor teacher tenure. Now I know that not everyone agrees. But schools can too easily be politically contentious places, both from inside and as a result of outside pressure. If we want strong teachers, we need to give … Continue reading

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  1. @MrPABruno says:

    Probably not the best way to sort tenure rules.//Tenure http://t.co/xvsRvj4A8n

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CALDER on tenure

CALDER has a nice conversation on the effects of eliminating tenure in the wake of the Vergara. Good points are made, with an emphasis on shedding light rather than the all-too-common political posturing. A few of my favorite quotes: Rick Hanushek: … Continue reading

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NYC tenure…and waiting for the other shoe to drop

New York City, the nation’s largest school district, has made big changes in how teacher tenure is awarded. Susanna Loeb and coauthors find that the change led to a very small increase in tenure denial, but a huge increase in … Continue reading

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Dumping tenure to grow the economy?

Suppose that the Vergara decision and its aftermath were to lead to the entire country replacing the worst two percent of teachers with average teachers? It’s pretty clear that students who benefited from the teacher upgrade would end up with higher … Continue reading

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Dismissing teachers: Is California Different?

The Vergara decision, assuming it’s upheld, will make it far easier to dismiss teachers in California. In California, it’s very, very hard to dismiss a teacher for cause. Harder than in most of the rest of the country. While it … Continue reading

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  1. In all the commentary on dismissing teachers, analysts should pay attention to the attrition rates in the educational profession. Recent research notes this rate nears 50% in the first 5 years of teaching, and rates of first year teachers have increased as well (http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2012/05/16/kappan_ingersoll.h31.html).
    As a retired administrator, I know that some who leave the profession might well be fine teachers who don’t want to remain in the K-12 world for a variety of reasons, but I believe most of those leaving are doing so because they find they are a mismatch in the profession. They learn this because they understand they are ineffective, and are helped to learn this by fellow teachers, administrators, parents, and even students.

    I’m not sure how to factor this very high attrition rate into understanding how to interpret the low dismissal rates that are found around the nation. The rate of doctors being forces out of the profession by professional boards is quite similar to the rate of teachers, but the attrition rate of new doctors is almost nothing. So the teaching profession actually is dismissing teachers at a far, far higher rate than is reported.
    What this means might well be that teaching is better ‘policed’ than other professions, and the mania to improve the opportunity to dismiss teachers is driven by a weak understanding of how teacher induction works.

    The article/research cited above is largely about teacher induction and worth reading.

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Vergara and culling out the worst teachers

If the Vergara decision holds, schools will be able to turf out extremely ineffective teachers. How much difference this makes depends on the answer to a couple of hard questions. Under the existing rules, schools in California have a year or … Continue reading

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Vergara: How bad is California?

The Vergara decision is a smack in the chops to how California does public education. Is education in California really all that bad? Yes. It’s not fair to call California’s K-12 system a total failure, but California certainly way under … Continue reading

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Vergara and compensating wage differentials

The Vergara is the stunning education event of the year. Maybe of the decade. What is to be said about the economics of the decision? Suppose that tenure really disappears. Whether you think tenure is a good idea or bad, a … Continue reading

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The economics of tenure

Discussions of teacher tenure largely omit the first point any economist would make. Tenure is valuable to teachers. Tenure may or may not be a good idea. (I think it’s a very good idea, albeit a healthy dose of reform … Continue reading

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  1. Nordy says:

    It’s probably worth noting that “career status” in North Carolina is much different than “tenure” as you define it. Career status is/was not “a guarantee that you can’t be fired.” It was a guarantee of a right to have a hearing if you are fired.

  2. Arthur McKee says:

    Dick,
    We’ve found that the enrollment figures in ed schools generally lag behind several years.
    Given that there has been a modest but palpable decline in the number of teachers across the country, and that teachers were more willing to ride out the recession in the classroom (rather than leave in their normal numbers) — maybe the enrollment declines have to do more with the perceived difficulty of landing a job recently than anything else.
    Obviously, your basic point is right, and it would be interesting to see if current enrollment figures, when the economy is beginning to pick up, lag behind pre-recession numbers in North Carolina (particularly compared with neighboring states — perhaps this is something of a natural experiment?)

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Tenure–Law and Practice

Tenure depends on the laws of each state, but tenure also depends on the practices (you might even call them the “cultural expectations”) of each school district. The recent NCTQ report on Los Angeles schools, the nation’s second largest district, … Continue reading

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