Tag Archives: Teacher supply

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Colleges: ed students=>teachers

On average, only about half of students majoring in education end up as teachers (at least in the year after graduation). Do more selective colleges do a better job at producing students who end up actually teaching? Apparently, college selectivity … Continue reading

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Selectivity and who teaches

With pressure on education schools to be more selective about choosing their students, it seems a good idea to ask how academic selectivity is related to who ends up actually teaching. Here’s a statistical estimate of the relation between SAT … Continue reading

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  1. Arthur McKee says:

    Dick,

    This is a great graph. What’s the source for this data?

    Thanks,
    Arthur

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More on education majors and the SAT

Several posts back I wrote about how education majors compare to others in terms of SAT performance. The answer was that ed majors do less well, but not by a huge gap. That finding depended in part on what you … Continue reading

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  1. Sherman Dorn says:

    I think the ability to distinguish between the SAT and “academic ability” would be an important characteristic of teachers. 😉

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Teacher training and teaching over the last decade

On Monday I looked at whether undergraduate education majors who received their degree in 2007-2008 were teaching the year after graduation. Have the numbers gotten worse over time? Looks that way. Compare the 2007-2008 numbers to the numbers 8 years … Continue reading

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Teacher surplus?

Do schools of education train too many students? And why would we care? Arthur McKee at NCTQ has been arguing that the answers are “probably” and “yes.” In particular, McKee points out that good mentors for student teachers are in … Continue reading

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