Tag Archives: Teacher supply

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Why do private schools need so many new teachers?

Roughly 12 percent of teachers work in private schools. But more than twice that fraction of new teachers, 28 percent, work in private schools. (Numbers are from the Digest of Education Statistics. They’re probably not perfect, but I suspect they’re close.) Why … Continue reading

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  1. “12% of teachers work in private schools…more than 2x that fraction of new teachers, 28%, work in private schools” http://t.co/eiLDYIpMev

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The demand for new teachers

The number of new teachers hired peaked just before the Great Recession. Hiring has since plummeted 25 percent. Government projections don’t suggest a huge rebound, and my guess is that the government numbers may be a smidgen high because government … Continue reading

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Why is the teaching force increasingly female?

Richard Ingersoll and coauthors write: With career and employment alternatives increasingly available, one might think that fewer women would enter occupations and professions that traditionally have been predominantly female. This has not happened for teaching. Both the number of women entering teaching and the … Continue reading

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  1. preserve says:

    Honest questions,
    Has the ratio of female/male graduating from universities shifted since the 80’s?
    Do females see a greater opportunity of promotion into administration now than in the 80’s? This may attract more women into the field.
    Where are the greatest shifts occurring? Primary or Secondary?

    • Dick Startz says:

      The ratio of women graduating from universities has indeed risen, and there are more women principals now. The shift is largely in secondary school. All these things do point in the direction of more women teachers. So I think you may have identified at least part of the answer.

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Scaling success

Wednesday’s post reported on a field experiment by Roland Fryer in which he imported a number of charter school techniques into low-performing Houston schools. The techniques made a very large difference in student outcomes in math (not in reading though). The changes … Continue reading

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What do student teachers do after they student teach?

Dan Goldhaber and crew have asked a question about the teacher labor market that I haven’t seen discussed elsewhere: Do student teachers go into teaching or do they end up in some other job? I was surprised to see how many … Continue reading

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Selectivity, accreditation, and the NCTQ report

A few weeks back I wrote about the possible effects of higher admission requirements for schools of education, such higher standards being part of the draft CAEP accreditation standard. If you were to look across ed schools, would you find … Continue reading

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Praxis by race

You may know that black teacher candidates have a lower rate of passing teacher licensure exams than do white teacher candidates. An ETS report documents that the gap. Here’s the key table from the report.The important observation is that the … Continue reading

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Teacher selectivity and college GPA

A couple of weeks back I looked at the statistical relationship between SAT scores and the probability that an education major ends up teaching the year after graduation (based on a logit I ran using the Baccalaureate and Beyond data). … Continue reading

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Becoming a teacher: undergraduate versus graduate degree

According to the Digest of Education Statistics, in 2010-11 there were 104,000 bachelor’s degrees in education and 185,000 master’s degrees. This has left me wondering how many out of that large number of master’s are credentialed teachers going back for … Continue reading

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  1. monisha says:

    You can link different types of courses together, during my time as a student I mixed Italian and health studies with creative writing

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Teacher supply again

The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education has a new report out presenting data from its annual survey of teacher colleges as well as from other sources. A couple of their numbers are particularly helpful for understanding the supply … Continue reading

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  1. Arthur McKee says:

    Dick,

    Keep in mind that 66,500 of the 164,000 teachers who had never taught before but who were hired had “delayed entry” into the profession — i.e., they’re part of the massive teacher reserve pool.

    The same NCES data set says that there are around 240,000 hires of teachers who had not taught in the previous year. The remainder (around 75,000) are teachers who had left the classroom for a time (e.g., maternity leave) but who came back.

    Considering the size of the reserve pool, I’d say that making teacher education programs more selective along the lines outlined by CAEP, and which you have modeled in the past few weeks, would be good policy.

    Here’s another question for you: if we reduced the supply of new teachers wouldn’t that put pressure on districts to increase salaries? Teacher labor markets are very tricky (intensely local, highly regulated, regimented contracts and the like) — but isn’t one reason why teacher salaries have not kept up with those of other college educated workers connected with this oversupply issue?

    By the way, this NCES data set from which all of us (AACTE, Ingersoll, NCTQ) are drawing these hiring figures should be updated soon (unless the sequester has slowed it down . . .).

    Best,
    Arthur

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