Tag Archives: teacher quality

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

An oldie but goodie on teacher salaries and teacher quality

David Figlio has an old article, but one I just came across, on teacher quality and teacher salaries. Figlio looked at teacher salaries across metropolitan areas, controlling for a number of characteristics of the metropolitan area including median household income, the size … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Academic ability of graduate students in education

About half of all teachers acquire master’s degrees. What do we know about how the academic ability of graduate students in education compares to graduate students in other disciplines? I’ve put together a picture using ETS data, but a few … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Academic ability of graduate students in education

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Alternative teacher training

In what’s bad news for schools of education, Tim Sass has looked at Florida teachers and compared teachers trained in traditional school of education programs to teachers who come through a variety of alternative certification programs. Bottom line? There’s not much … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Alternative teacher training

  1. sjl says:

    Surely “value-added” is the appropriate metric here as well, but what influence do the background variables in the table have on teacher effectiveness in general?

    • Dick Startz says:

      The general result is that the effect of these background variables is small–or at least hard to detect–although this specific paper doesn’t report on their effect.

      I’m not sure “value-added” is the right metric. If an alternative program could bring in “just-as-good” teachers as a school of education, and do so more cheaply, why would we need teacher training from a school of ed?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *