Tag Archives: teacher experience

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

More on teacher experience

A quickie on teachers getting better with more experience. The long-held view was that teachers improve rapidly for two or three years, or at most five years or so, and then do not improve much past that. (On average, of … Continue reading

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  1. RT @NCTQ: .@ProfitOfEd: new evidence that #teachers improve beyond 5 yrs exp. http://t.co/u8XUR3H5lK Top is math, then reading http://t.co/…

  2. “half of return to experience shows up in the first five years and the rest is spread out over the rest of a career” http://t.co/9DPsvfIRs6

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More on teacher experience

Today, another piece of evidence that teachers continue to get better with experience. Helen Ladd and Lucy Sorensen offer new findings, based on middle school teachers in North Carolina, suggesting that learning-on-the-job continues for an extended period, perhaps a decade or so. … Continue reading

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  1. @PPTAWeb says:

    Greater teacher experience correlated with improved student outcomes http://t.co/C4fyiN6zH2 via @ProfitOfEd http://t.co/vFlHuPLxnp

  2. @MrPABruno says:

    “teachers continue to improve gradually for another decade or more” http://t.co/6o2ZlbYVn5

  3. @ProfitOfEd says:

    More on teacher experience: Today, another piece of evidence that teachers continue to get better with experienc… http://t.co/ZpzrbasiN4

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Changing views on teacher experience

Matt Wiswall has a nice Bill Gates’ quote about teacher experience. Once somebody has taught for three years their teaching quality does not change thereafter. That quote is a pretty fair representation of what past research has shown. Well, maybe gains … Continue reading

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9 Responses to Changing views on teacher experience

  1. @NShrubs says:

    RT @MrPABruno: Changing views on teacher experience http://t.co/5iIwAukHIb

  2. @symphily says:

    RT @MrPABruno: Changing views on teacher experience http://t.co/5iIwAukHIb

  3. @jelmerevers says:

    Interesting, but what outcomes? “softer” side definitely growth “@MrPABruno: Changing views on teacher experience http://t.co/IWtqspDXNt”

  4. @ProfitOfEd says:

    Changing views on teacher experience: Matt Wiswall has a nice Bill Gates’ quote about teacher experience.
    Once … http://t.co/c3GOTS6Swh

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Teacher experience: general versus grade specific

My last post discussed work by Ben Ost showing that teachers switch grades a lot. Ost goes on to ask how much grade level experience matters. The answer is: quite a bit. Everyone knows that more experienced teachers get better results (at … Continue reading

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Changing grades

Here’s an interesting factoid: teachers change the grade they teach fairly often. Ben Ost has put together data on North Carolina primary school teachers. In this table that Ost created, the first column is the teacher’s grade this year. Moving … Continue reading

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Teachers at schools in poverty

Here’s a picture that tells you something you already knew: kids at wealthier schools get more experienced teachers than do kids at schools where much of the population is in poverty. It’s well-established that beginning teachers aren’t as good as … Continue reading

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Grumpy academic and assessing first-year teachers

The New Teacher Project has released findings, Leap Year, from their program for assessing first-year teachers. The TNTP report provides some great information that can certainly help school districts work with first-year teachers. I found one statement especially exciting. Multiple measures … Continue reading

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  1. Jesse Rothstein says:

    The MET data showed similarly low correlations (though I’m not sure they are exactly comparable — MET reported mostly “disattenuated” correlations that abstracted from year-to-year variability in value-added). And MET drew similar conclusions from those low correlations. See the review I wrote here:

    http://nepc.colorado.edu/files/ttr-final-met-rothstein.pdf

    I read the evidence the same way you do. But what to make of it? I’m not sure. I don’t see any way to decide which of the measures is/isn’t getting at something important except by validating them against each other. So is there a better way to learn about this than simply to try implementing policies based on various combinations of the measures, then evaluating those policies?

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Wow, lots of newbie teachers

If you want to know what’s changed about who’s teaching? Here’s a “one picture is worth a thousand words” summary that appears in Richard Ingersoll and Lisa Merrill’s “Seven Trends” paper. The fraction of teachers with under a decade of … Continue reading

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What training characteristics make for a good teacher? Who knows–again!

Matthew Chingos and Paul Peterson looked through a massive data set of Florida teachers, linking up the value-added scores of each teacher’s students with the teacher’s training and experience. (“It’s easier to pick a good teacher than to train one.”) … Continue reading

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Teacher experience: long-run results

Yesterday’s post covered some clear results in the remarkable paper by Chetty, Friedman, Hilger, Saez, Schanzenbach, and Yagan. Today I want to talk about their findings on teacher experience, because I’m concerned these results will be taken out of context … Continue reading

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