Tag Archives: teacher evaluations

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Making VAM public

Back in 2010, the Los Angeles Times published value-added scores for LA teachers. This may have been good journalism, but from the point of view of helping education the appropriate technical term is “dumbass.” Hey, value-added is an important tool. Judging … Continue reading

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  1. RT @MrPABruno: “main effect of [VAM] publication was to let more savvy parents arrange for their kids to get the better teachers” http://t.…

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More on teacher evaluation in Chicago

In February, I wrote about an academic article by Matthew P. Steinberg and Lauren Sartain in which they reported on Chicago’s experiment in doing serious teacher evaluation. Steinberg and Sartain now have a semi-popular version of their work in EducationNext. The new version … Continue reading

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Predicting future teacher performance: value-added versus principal evaluations

Douglas Harris and Tim Sass use Florida data to ask an awfully important practical question: If you have both teacher value-added numbers and principal evaluations, which does better at predicting future teacher contributions? Do the two methods each have something separate … Continue reading

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Teacher evaluation in Chicago

Matthew Steinberg and Lauren Sartain take a look at a Chicago program in which principals evaluated teachers following careful classroom observations. The results are a bit of a cautionary tale for those folks–I’m one–who think that the mere presence of … Continue reading

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DC IMPACT and Highly Effective teachers

Let’s continue Monday’s discussion of Thomas Dee and James Wyckoff’s examination of Washington, D.C.’s IMPACT teacher evaluation program. A key element of the program is that a teacher rated Highly Effective, about 1 teacher out of 7,  gets a significant financial reward. … Continue reading

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DC IMPACT and teacher incentives

Thomas Dee and James Wyckoff offer careful evidence showing that the incentives embedded in Washington, DC’s IMPACT have real–and desirable–effects on which teachers stay in teaching and which ones leave. What Dee and Wyckoff did was to compare teachers just … Continue reading

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Teacher performance estimates: some facts

As promised Monday, here are some facts on the source of variation in value-added estimates of teacher ability. I’ve condensed these down from a newly published paper by Dan Goldhaber and Michael Hansen. Here’s a picture. What this means is that … Continue reading

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Teacher performance estimates: errors and changes

Teacher evaluations are all the rage, and using value-added assessments based on student test scores is a big part of the new wave. Of course, a teacher’s score changes from year to year. Whether such changes matter depend on what … Continue reading

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Two views on the value of value-added measures

Economists find value-added measures (roughly, the change in student test scores from one year to the next) enormously useful in measuring educational outcomes. Whether VAM is so useful for teacher personnel policy is a whole lot less clear. In an article … Continue reading

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Florida’s sophisticated value-added model

You may have seen in the news, or in Monday’s post, that Florida’s value-added model shows no correlation between teacher evaluation scores and student background, something that should reassure teachers. Unfortunately, some of the press coverage has missed the point … Continue reading

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