Tag Archives: Susanna Loeb

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Who Enters Teaching?

A bit over a year ago I wrote about work done by Dan Goldhaber and Joe Walch that showed nation-wide evidence of improving teacher ability. New results from “Who Enters Teaching?,” by Lankford, Loeb, McEachin, Miller, and Wyckoff, offers similar … Continue reading

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  1. As for the last, it’s probably loan forgiveness.

    I’ve been pointing this out for over three years, now. It’s probably less about “more higher scoring teachers” than it is “fewer low scoring teachers” because in 2002, the tests got harder. We have been consistently chopping off the bottom. Of course, there’s no evidence that this improves student outcomes.

    But “smarter teachers=smarter students”, like “stricter gun laws=less crime” and “tougher drug bans=fewer addicts”, is just a truism that people apparently need more time to figure out.

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NYC tenure…and waiting for the other shoe to drop

New York City, the nation’s largest school district, has made big changes in how teacher tenure is awarded. Susanna Loeb and coauthors find that the change led to a very small increase in tenure denial, but a huge increase in … Continue reading

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Heterogeneity in “learning that lasts”

One of the criticisms of measuring teacher quality with test scores and value-added measures is that test scores don’t measure learning that really matters, in particular that whatever test scores do measure isn’t something that lasts. However, there is increasing … Continue reading

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More experienced teachers get assigned higher scoring students

One suspects that more experienced teachers get handed easier to teach students. Not always of course, but on average. One mechanism is that more experienced teachers move to districts with higher socioeconomic status teachers, or move to “nicer” schools within … Continue reading

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Measuring test measurement error

Ever just have a bad day? Ever take a test on a bad day? One reason that test scores are imperfect is that scores partially reflect what a kid had for breakfast on test day or whether particularly interesting clouds were floating … Continue reading

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  1. Jesse Rothstein says:

    Do you have a link to the paper? I’d be interested to see it.

    In the North Carolina data, I worked out a few years ago that the published reliability for the test scores implied that gain scores had reliability around 0.2. If the published reliability is too high, gain scores are even less reliable than that.

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How Do Effective Schools Get Effective Teachers?

Since teachers are so important to effective schools, it’s awfully useful to understand how it is that good schools end up with good teachers. Susanna Loeb and colleagues have a new paper that looks at the pattern of match-ups in … Continue reading

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Teacher turnover harms student achievement

Does teacher turnover hurt learning? For a particular school, the answer must be “it depends who leaves and who comes.” However, Susanna Loeb and colleagues looked at teacher turnover for the New York City schools, and asked what happens on average. … Continue reading

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Ed schools matter

Ed schools matter to what the students of the students of the ed schools learn. That’s the lesson of a paper by Donald J. Boyd, Pamela L. Grossman, Hamilton Lankford, Susanna Loeb and James Wyckoff that sorted New York City value-added … Continue reading

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Passing Muster

The new Brookings report “Passing Muster: Evaluating Teacher Evaluation Systems” (authors: Steven Glazerman, Dan Goldhaber, Susanna Loeb, Stephen Raudenbush, Douglas O. Staiger, and Grover J. Whitehurst) offers a practical guide for moving forward on implementation of teacher evaluation systems. Teacher … Continue reading

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