Tag Archives: School and staffing survey

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Pension debt: not the unions’ fault

If you don’t have enough to worry your mind, read the NCTQ’s report on teacher pension funding. The unfunded part of pension debt has risen a 100 billion dollars over the last few years. I had assumed that teacher unions and … Continue reading

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  1. @NCTQ says:

    RT @ProfitOfEd: #pension debt: not unions’ fault: If u don’t have enough to worry about, read @NCTQ report. http://t.co/pQ0vtccFS6

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College readiness

A huge amount of noise is made everywhere in the country about the notion that high schools should prepare students for college. The plain fact is that states vary enormously in the fraction of high school students who proceed to … Continue reading

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Race: Who goes to school where

We all know that America remains significantly segregated by race. Still, I was surprised by the most recent School and Staffing Survey results. As an initial benchmark, 56 percent of public school students are white (non-Hispanic)–a bit more than half. … Continue reading

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Unions and incentive pay

Teacher unions come under a lot of criticism for resisting all reforms. Some of the criticism is warranted, but much isn’t. To say something objective about unions, I’ve taken data from the most recent School and Staffing Survey measuring the … Continue reading

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How high can you go?

One reason we don’t have more great people stick at teaching is that teacher salaries top out at not very high levels. There are individual districts where the high-end salaries aren’t too bad, although these are often districts in very … Continue reading

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Teacher job security

For all the talk of both fluctuating education budgets and increased teacher evaluations, teaching remains a remarkably secure job. The latest figures from the School and Staffing Survey (Table 8, giving 2010-2011 data) show that, nationwide, less than two percent … Continue reading

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Allocation of teacher hours in poor and wealthy schools

I made a little picture of the allocation of teacher hours in poor versus wealthier schools, taking data from the most recent School and Staffing survey tables. Teachers in schools with most students on free or reduced-price lunch spend an … Continue reading

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Teachers at schools in poverty

Here’s a picture that tells you something you already knew: kids at wealthier schools get more experienced teachers than do kids at schools where much of the population is in poverty. It’s well-established that beginning teachers aren’t as good as … Continue reading

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Just what has happened to class size???

Moving students into smaller classes gets a lot of attention. It also gets a lot of money. The graph here is supposed to make you say “Uh oh, what’s going on?” Trends first. Look at the student/teacher ratio (the red … Continue reading

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