Tag Archives: SAT

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Math pays outside teaching, not for teachers though

Teachers get paid for experience and credentials, but not for specific skills. Patrick Walsh explains that outside of K-12 education, both math and verbal skills get rewarded…but math skills get rewarded more. Unsurprisingly, people with more math skills are drawn … Continue reading

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Teacher skills: math versus verbal

Patrick Walsh has taken data from Baccalaureate and Beyond to look at math versus verbal skills for teachers versus nonteachers. Next time I’ll talk about his results on how the teacher/nonteacher salary gap is different for people really good at … Continue reading

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SATs by family income

It will surprise you not at all to hear that students from higher income families get higher SAT scores. Here’s a picture of the 2013 facts. Unless you’ve recently been in the college hunt, you may not have a good … Continue reading

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Latest data on SATs by intended college major

Here’s a snapshot of the latest SAT scores by intended college major from the College Board, for the most popular majors. The reading and writing scores for intended ed majors are a bit below the average for all test-takers. The … Continue reading

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More on improving teacher SAT scores

A recent post discussed a study by Dan Goldhaber and Joe Walch showing that teacher SAT scores are improving. Education Realist posted an interesting comment arguing that part of what’s going on is a composition effect. The suggestion is that … Continue reading

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Teacher SATs are improving

Dan Goldhaber and Joe Walch have some happy news for us: SATs of new teachers are improving. That’s a headline that’s been picked up on, but Goldhaber and Walch offer more than just that simple blog-byte. Take a look at … Continue reading

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  1. And, as always, I’ve been writing about why for a long time:

    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2013/10/31/teacher-quality-report-lacking-a-certain-quality/

    Average white teacher quality has always been quite high. The new requirements in 2002 did much to chop off the bottom group, which was almost entirely black and Hispanic.

    Wouldn’t it be nice, though, if there were any evidence that chopping off that bottom group, wiping out a lot of black and Hispanic teachers, actually improved outcomes? But let’s ignore that part, and just celebrate the further whitening of the teacher force.

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Accreditation, SAT scores, and differences among schools of ed

The new CAEP accreditation standards raise the bar on admission requirements for education schools. How much of an effect this will have on who gets in to ed schools depends in part on the differences in the applicant pools for … Continue reading

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  1. Peggy Farber says:

    Dick – I suspect you’ve given this to us already, but what is the ratio of low SAT schools/high SAT schools?

    • Dick Startz says:

      There is generic evidence that there are big differences across schools in SAT scores, but so far as I know there is no data at all for individual ed schools.

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Accreditation and SAT targets

The final CAEP accreditation standards are out and, perhaps not surprisingly, CAEP has slowed down implementation of higher SAT requirements for admission to schools of education. Here are the final standards for admitted applicants The¬†group average¬†performance on a national test, … Continue reading

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School spending and student outcomes

Economists largely believe that simply increasing spending on schools doesn’t do much to improve students’ outcomes. An important part of the evidence is due to “David Card and A. Abigail Payne”. Card and Payne looked at court ordered changes in … Continue reading

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Raising standards, SATs, and race

The draft accreditation standards for schools of education call for higher average SAT scores for teacher training programs. This raises an uncomfortable question about race. Students from racial minorities score lower on the SAT than do white students. Will the … Continue reading

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  1. Sigh. You really don’t think much about credentialing tests, do you?

    The Higher Education Act of 1998 or so made a change that resulted in all ed schools requiring that their candidates pass the credentialing tests before they enter the program. The credentialing pass rates are quite dismal. The ed schools can make whatever “adjustments” they like–of course, you do know that affirmative action is illegal in a few states, right?–but a degree is nothing without the credential, and the URM passing rates on the credential test are a bloodbath.

    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2012/07/23/radio-silence-on-clarence-mumford/
    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2012/11/28/more-on-mumford/

    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2013/03/31/its-the-tests-zitbrains/

    Read them all. Also, read Steven Sawchuk’s great piece: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/05/08/30entry_ep.h32.html?utm_source=fb&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mrss

  2. MrPABruno says:

    I think it’s notable that alt-cert programs seem to have more racial diversity.

    http://www.paul-bruno.com/why-are-some-credentialing-programs-more-racially-diverse-than-others/

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