Tag Archives: Roland Fryer

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Elite high schools and peer effects

Do elite high school produce elite results…over and above what would be expected from the fact that students admitted to elite high schools are academically gifted? Will Dobbie and Roland Fryer looked at three New York City high schools where … Continue reading

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Scaling success

Wednesday’s post reported on a field experiment by Roland Fryer in which he imported a number of charter school techniques into low-performing Houston schools. The techniques made a very large difference in student outcomes in math (not in reading though). The changes … Continue reading

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Taking charter school practices to the public schools

Some charter schools are enormously effective. Can specific practices from successful such charter schools be transplanted into regular public schools, bringing their success along with them? A real field experiment run by Roland Fryer suggests that enormous gains can be … Continue reading

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Don’t give up on kids

There’s been a considerable push in the last couple of years to focus on early childhood education. This is a case where science is successfully influencing public policy, as the evidence is good, although not conclusive, that early childhood intervention … Continue reading

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The Promise Academy and mid-term results

Will Dobbie and Roland Fryer return with a new look at medium-term results of charter schools, most specifically the Harlem Promise Academy. Most evaluation of education policy looks at test scores, in part because they’re easily measurable. This is subject to … Continue reading

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Weekday boarding school

SEED charter schools follow the “no excuses” model of education, but what makes them really different is that students board at school five days and return to their parents only on weekends. SEED schools try to imbue their captive students … Continue reading

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  1. Murray says:

    All I can think when I read this is that this is precisely what was being said about Indian residential schools 80-odd years ago (at last in Canada). Now, the efforts to “imbue their captive students with middle class attitudes and skills”, etc, are seen as evil. As with SEED, many Indian parents were enthusiastic about getting their children into the schools, though none will admit it now.

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Teacher incentives don’t seem to work

If only teachers had financial incentives to be better at their job all our educational problems would be solved. This seems to be the magical thinking du jour in many state legislatures. Interestingly, economists are much less enthused. (And I … Continue reading

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  1. Pingback: Why Doesn’t Merit Pay Work? | Paul Bruno

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Better schools versus better neighborhoods

Do we have to fix neighborhoods to get better education for poor kids? Let’s hope not. There’s strong evidence that better neighborhoods don’t improve educational outcomes if the better neighborhoods don’t also have better schools. Roland Fryer and Lawrence Katz … Continue reading

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Incentives in Houston

As part of his extended experiments with the Houston public schools, Roland Fryer reports on a trial which he calls “Aligning Student, Parent, and Teacher Incentives.” Fryer paid students for mastering math objectives, paid parents $20 for attending parent-teacher conferences … Continue reading

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Macro versus micro factors in fixing education

In “Getting Beneath the Veil of Effective Schools,” Will Dobbie and Roland Fryer measure how the effectiveness of 35 charter schools in New York City is correlated with the kind of big picture (macro) reform measures that politicians and most … Continue reading

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