Tag Archives: PISA

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Math illiteracy, here and there

I’ve made a little bar chart of math literacy levels for 15 year-olds. 6 is higher than 1, so we’d like to see big bars on the right side of the graph. Compare first the U.S. (red) to the other … Continue reading

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Teacher pay and student performance around the world

Peter Dolton and Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez have the best linkage of teacher salaries and student outcomes across countries that I’ve seen. The authors put together a data set covering two dozen or so countries over more than 10 years. The data includes … Continue reading

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Teacher status matters

I recommend reading 2013 Global Teacher Status Index written by Peter Dolton and Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez for the Varkey GEMS Foundation. The nice, interactive web site has all sorts of goodies and the full report is an easy read. Dolton and Marcenaro-Gutierrez surveyed … Continue reading

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Math vs Reading: US vs the World

I have a theory that math performance is more important than reading performance at the upper end of the distribution of academic ability. (I do not have hard evidence for this theory. Maybe my focus on math comes from being … Continue reading

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The advantaged do well

I’ve edited a picture from Carnoy and Rothstein’s report “What Do International Tests Really Show About U.S. Student Performance?” to show how students from the upper social classes compare in the U.S. relative to other countries. Here, “upper social class” … Continue reading

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  1. Murray says:

    I’m more than a little surprised to see that the number of books in a home is still used to define “upper social class”. The number of educational DVDs in the home, or the number of “quality” books on a child’s Kindle perhaps?

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We don’t suck that much

Martin Carnoy and Richard Rothstein’s report released two weeks ago by the Economic Policy Institute, “What Do International Tests Really Show About U.S. Student Performance?” has received a good deal of press attention. That’s well deserved because it makes a … Continue reading

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Teacher salaries and results–around the world

Does paying teachers more (relative to what other college educated workers earn) lead to better results. Today, a chart showing reading scores (PISA scores) in 25 countries and how they vary with how well teachers are paid. Given that I spend a … Continue reading

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West Virginia, Finland: High road and low road

Should educational reformers focus on fixing the abysmal outcomes in America’s worst classes? Or, emulating Finland as West Virginia is trying to do, should we be reinforcing the best teachers? Frankly, a policy that focuses on getting rid of the … Continue reading

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International advice

You may remember when the U.S. used to be scolded for giving advice to other countries on how to better manage their affairs. On the topic of education, we now seem to be the ones on the receiving end. Whether we … Continue reading

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