Tag Archives: Paul Peterson

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Educating kids from families with and without much education

Rick Hanushek, Paul Peterson, and Ludger Woessmann offer the following graph comparing educational outcomes across states while controlling for parental education. (The bright red arrows are my addition.) The circle for each state shows the percentage of 10th graders proficient … Continue reading

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U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests

So I lifted the title of this post from the very nice piece over at Education Next. Recommended reading if you have a few minutes. If you have a few more minutes, you might want to go through the longer, … Continue reading

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NYC vouchers and poverty vs school quality

Mathew Chingos and Paul Peterson have a nice piece “The Impact of School Vouchers on College Enrollment” in Education Next where they look at the effects (in terms of later college attendance) of providing modest size vouchers to poor kids in New … Continue reading

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Vouchers for little kids, college later?

Vouchers are a perennial hot topic. My personal view is that the heat-to-light ratio is unfortunately high. Conservatives believe that choice is a magic wand; liberals believe that anything that might divert money from public schools is an evil conspiracy. … Continue reading

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2 Responses to Vouchers for little kids, college later?

  1. Stuart Buck says:

    It was an intent-to-treat analysis. Winning the voucher automatically includes all of the kids who used it, as well as those who didn’t. So that makes it harder to see as much effect from the voucher, because you’re not letting kids who select out of treatment escape being counted in the analysis.

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What training characteristics make for a good teacher? Who knows–again!

Matthew Chingos and Paul Peterson looked through a massive data set of Florida teachers, linking up the value-added scores of each teacher’s students with the teacher’s training and experience. (“It’s easier to pick a good teacher than to train one.”) … Continue reading

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Value added models and teacher evaluation

The new report from the Brookings Institution, “Evaluating Teachers: The Important Role of Value-Added,” gives a nicely balanced presentation on the merits and pitfalls of using value added measures (VAM) in teacher evaluation. In Profit of Education I wrote, “a compensation system … Continue reading

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High achieving math students

Here’s breaking news on a study of high achieving math students. The bad news: America doesn’t stack up well to the competition. Eric Hanushek, Paul Peterson, and Ludger Woessmann released a new study late yesterday that does something a little unusual. … Continue reading

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2 Responses to High achieving math students

  1. SJL says:

    I agree with MS about the meaning of “heterogeneous”. In this context, the performance of countries with a very high proportion of foreign-born, such as Australia (26%) and Canada (about 20%) is interesting.

    Back to your key point–we know that the typical elementary teacher in the United States is unqualified to teach math.

  2. MS says:

    Come on, you know what “heterogenous” is code for.

    And this report is extremely upfront in saying that racial or socioeconomic diversity doesn’t explain this problem away. Even restricting the sample to white kids with at least one college educated parent, we still don’t stack up well relative to other countries.

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