Tag Archives: OECD

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

How much time spent teaching?

A couple of weeks back I wrote about international comparisons of the number of hours that teachers spend actually teaching. The numbers I presented showed that American teachers put in more hours than their counterparts. So I was surprised to … Continue reading

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Engineers

If I may depart from K-12 briefly, here’s a graph comparing the fraction of college degrees given in engineering in the U.S. versus other industrialized economies. The U.S. produces a lower fraction of bachelor’s degrees in engineering than any other … Continue reading

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More money for education???

It is an article of faith among many that American education is starved for funds. I certainly advocate spending more. Nonetheless, today’s evidence compares U.S. spending to spending in other countries and suggests we’re already at the high end. (The … Continue reading

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  1. Nordy says:

    Coming back to add that class size ratios could certainly help explain our higher per student spending. Do we think that’s the driver?

    • Dick Startz says:

      Some part of the high U.S. figure more money spent on other-than-teacher-staff. Average class size is probably not a big driver. Total staff per student is about 12 percent higher in the U.S. than the OECD average, much of the difference being teacher aides. This is probably not the full picture though.

  2. Nordy says:

    I’m starting to think there might be problems with the OECD data. The data you presented in your 10/12 post on teacher working hours doesn’t seem to reflect what we know (or think we know?) with regards to hours of instruction.

    Now, we’re presented with OECD data that seems inconsistent with what we know (or think we know?) about teacher pay. If we aren’t paying our teachers as much as other countries are, then how do we have higher expenditures per student? Teacher assistants? Transportation? Or is the data itself suspect?

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Teacher hours

Teachers probably work fewer hours than most other folks (over the course of a year). The extent of the difference is likely less than many believe because many teachers work so many hours off the clock. That being said, the data … Continue reading

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  1. Nordy says:

    How does this data make sense, given what we know about US hours of instruction compared to other countries?

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Land of opportunity

We American’s pride ourselves on living in the Land of Opportunity. It doesn’t matter what your family background is–work hard and you can get ahead. Distressingly, “intergenerational mobility,” as we economists like to call it, is no longer one of … Continue reading

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Getting serious about teacher salaries

The United States isn’t serious about education reform unless it can be be brought about on the cheap. Most particularly, we are unwilling to pay teachers what it would take to attract enough of the best and brightest away from … Continue reading

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Teacher salaries and results–around the world

Does paying teachers more (relative to what other college educated workers earn) lead to better results. Today, a chart showing reading scores (PISA scores) in 25 countries and how they vary with how well teachers are paid. Given that I spend a … Continue reading

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College ed and American non-exceptionalism

The 2012 Education at a Glance (OECD) has a nice picture showing college completion in the countries we compete with. While the definitions of “tertiary education” aren’t identical across countries and while the data for several countries (notably Russia and … Continue reading

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International advice

You may remember when the U.S. used to be scolded for giving advice to other countries on how to better manage their affairs. On the topic of education, we now seem to be the ones on the receiving end. Whether we … Continue reading

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