Tag Archives: National Council on Teacher Quality

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Tenure

I strongly favor teacher tenure. Now I know that not everyone agrees. But schools can too easily be politically contentious places, both from inside and as a result of outside pressure. If we want strong teachers, we need to give … Continue reading

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  1. @MrPABruno says:

    Probably not the best way to sort tenure rules.//Tenure http://t.co/xvsRvj4A8n

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Majoring in education

I wrote last month about my surprise at learning that only about half of teachers were education majors. Dan Goldhaber sent me a note pointing out that a number of states encourage potential teachers to do an “academic” major, and … Continue reading

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  1. @MrPABruno says:

    Given how many subjects elementary teaches have to teach, not sure an academic concentration in college would help. http://t.co/fhQMUqsyns

  2. @ProfitOfEd says:

    Majoring in education: I wrote last month about my surprise at learning that only about half of teachers were ed… http://t.co/uBF7BktABD

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Easy A’s

“Easy A’s and What’s Behind Them,” by Hannah Putnam, Julie Greenberg, and Kate Walsh at the National Council on Teacher Quality, adds to the evidence that schools of education give out an awful lot of high grades. The NCTQ folks … Continue reading

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Teacher employment in the Great Recession

Recent correspondence with Arthur McKee at the National Council on Teacher Quality brought up an interesting question: What happened to teacher unemployment in the Great Recession? I don’t think anyone has a for-sure answer, but I’ve cobbled together a bit … Continue reading

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  1. Jesse says:

    I think respondents are instructed to give the occupation of their last job if they are unemployed or out of the labor force. So in principle this should identify teachers who have been laid off, but it won’t capture those who just graduated from schools and never got jobs in the first place, which I think accounts for a very large part of teacher unemployment in the last few years. (Most other occupations aren’t tied quite so closely to the degree you earn.)

    A couple of other issues in interpreting this:
    – My guess is the high rate of out-of-the-labor-force reflects teachers who don’t work or look for work over the summer. I assume the underlying data here is the CPS; if so, it should be possible to exclude summer months.
    – If a teacher takes a summer job, then is not called back for the fall, she should report her occupation thereafter as whatever she did over the summer rather than as a teacher (since it refers to the previous job, not the self identity). I don’t know if that is fixable.
    – What is going on with the year 2000? Did teacher unemployment really shoot up in 2001 and stay very high thereafter? It seems unlikely — in 2005, people were talking about looming teacher shortages.

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NCTQ State Stars

I’ve made a little map showing the average number of stars awarded by the NCTQ to ed schools in each state. This particular map shows stars for undergraduate training for both elementary and secondary school teachers. Green is a high score and red is … Continue reading

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Prediction

The U.S. News & World Report ratings of 1,000+ teacher ed programs–prepared courtesy of the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ)–are due out this week. Here are my predictions for the responses from schools of education. Schools rated highly: We … Continue reading

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Hole in the bucket and some jealousy on my part

There’s something I’ve been trying to say for several years now. NCTQ’s Ruth Oyeyemi not only said it, she said it really, really cleverly (so I’m a bit jealous.) Ever hear the classic song, the Hole in the Bucket? Its … Continue reading

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Nice words from NCTQ

NCTQ had some kind words about me and Profit in a recent PDQ. Even the most die-hard ed reformers will admit to the occasional twinge of self-doubt over the ability  of teachers, however talented, to overcome the adversity that fills so many   … Continue reading

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Value-added and evaluating teacher preparation programs

The quality of teacher training programs and schools of education is a hot topic. (It’s going to get hotter when the folks at NCTQ release their national rankings.) I’ve thought that one incredibly important piece of objective evidence in evaluating … Continue reading

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  1. Jane Close Conoley says:

    As in any professional training endeavor the outcomes we get in teacher training are affected by how/whom we select, the experiences we offer during preparation, the situations novice teachers find themselves in during their beginning years, and the ongoing support we offer novices and practicing educators. On the ground, employers notice differences among programs in terms of novice teacher readiness to take the helm of a classroom. Translating these into snapshots of student achievement, however, is difficult. If teacher skills account for about 40% of variance in student achievement and teacher preparation accounts for ??% in teacher skills the actual effects of program on a single measure is quite likely to be small.

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How much do teachers work?

How much do teachers work over the course of the year? Let me tell you that no one has the slightest idea. Here’s why: First, different sources put work hours per week (during the school year) anywhere from about 40 hours a … Continue reading

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8 Responses to How much do teachers work?

  1. Jack says:

    As a veteran (elementary) teacher–I can say with all certainty that teachers work many, many hours outside of their contracts–both in the evenings grading and planning—AND answering emails from parents. Sundays at my house are often spent planning for the week ahead. I have never ever reported to work at 9 a.m. I typically arrive at school by 7 and leave after 5. Teachers have 30-40 minutes for lunch during which time I eat lunch (standing) while I am prepping for my afternoon classes. If I’m lucky, I get to go to the restroom…….Another misnomer—that teachers have ‘all summer’ off—in our dreams! Between attending professional developments, training, out of state PD, and setting up classrooms, our vacation comes out to two or three weeks at a run. Oh, and did I mention back to school nights, PTO meetings, mentoring other teachers, school celebrations and functions? You don’t get paid for those at all. 🙂

  2. Melissa says:

    @globeteck Don’t forget to subtract all the sick days, personal days, & vacation days. Did I miss anything?
    I remember teachers doing their work while students are working on theirs.

  3. Peter Bayliss says:

    Absolute rubbish.

    Teachers clock on at 9am and schools out at 3pm – how in the hell do you get 40-50 hours per week. The teacher next door to us is home at 3.20pm on the dot every day !!!
    The more pertinent question is how long does the teacher actually teach classes each day. An ex teacher I know puts it at around 3-4 hours per day. Teachers, through their
    union, have become the most underworked and overpaid “workers” in Australia bar none. They are also incompetent as any cursory reading of Australia’s numeracy and literacy deterioration shows.

    • Tiffany says:

      Not all teachers clock in at 9 just saying. Most clock in at around 7 for high school. They do not leave until at least 3. That is 8 hours right there. Now if they need to work over time for a sport or to help a student, that is where they get all the hours.

    • Marie says:

      There is so much more that goes in to teaching than being in the classroom or even at school. Please do not compare clocking in and out of a ‘leave it at work’ job, with teaching. Teachers are planning and preparing before they go into school each morning, and each afternoon, along with part of their weekends, and a good bulk of their summers are: planning, grading, researching, preparing, and shopping for classes amongst other things.

      Most teachers are in their building by 7:30 average. School lets out around 3, but many teachers also have after-school responsibilities, classes or tutoring.
      Before school: Plan out morning message, board work, prepare folders etc 30min*5= 2.5 hrs
      At school: Teaching 5 periods, 45 min each 4.5 hours*5= 18.75 hrs
      After-school class 2*45min= 1.5 hrs
      Grading 23 papers, 23 Writing notebooks, 23 Math notebooks = 2.5hrs*4 nights= 10 hrs
      Researching for, planning for, creating materials for engaging lessons = 2hrs*3 = 6 hrs + 2*3hrs on the weekend = 12 hrs
      We’re already at 44.75 hrs and we haven’t added in: planning meetings, Professional Development meetings, extra time on certain weeks for Parent Teacher Conferences, Final grading and report cards, portfolios, school productions, etc

      Walking in my door, does not mean I am not working for my school, my class and my students. It just means I’m not doing it inside the school building.

    • Kate says:

      Your comment is rubbish. Do not make ridiculous remarks on something you don’t know anything about. Most teachers work more than 8 hours a day. Also why are you creepily spying on the teacher next door to you for you to know that she/he is home at 3:20pm every day? Why does it matter to you anyways?

  4. @globeteck says:

    @brother_polight #IRS LMAO Teachers get paid $40k to work 172 days a year https://t.co/FH3VeWeflH
    https://t.co/o9DgRZwIrO

  5. Pingback: The Truth Behind Teacher Unions - Democrats, Republicans, Libertarians, Conservatives, Liberals, Third Parties, Left-Wing, Right-Wing, Congress, President - Page 14 - City-Data Forum

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