Tag Archives: Matthew Springer

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Disappointing news on TAP

The Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) seems to be doing a lot of things right. TAP focuses on teacher excellence, on accountability, on multiple career paths, and on paying more to more effective teachers. That’s why this new evaluation of TAP by … Continue reading

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Teacher incentives don’t seem to work in Texas either

Matthew Springer and colleagues report on the accumulating evidence that simple financial incentives for teachers don’t work. Springer’s team reports on an experiment tried in the Round Rock, Texas (suburban Austin) school district.  In Round Rock, middle school teachers work in … Continue reading

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Teacher incentives in New York–a little of what went wrong

Julie Marsh, Matthew Springer, and team’s in-depth study of the New York City teacher incentive pay experiment sheds some light on why the experiment didn’t produce better student results. Here are two quotes from the report about problems that I … Continue reading

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Teacher incentives don’t seem to work

If only teachers had financial incentives to be better at their job all our educational problems would be solved. This seems to be the magical thinking du jour in many state legislatures. Interestingly, economists are much less enthused. (And I … Continue reading

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One Response to Teacher incentives don’t seem to work

  1. Pingback: Why Doesn’t Merit Pay Work? | Paul Bruno

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