Tag Archives: Jonah Rockoff

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Applicant Hiring vs Performance

I had the pleasure this week of hearing Jonah Rockoff talk about a paper he’s written with several colleagues, “Teacher Applicant Hiring and Teacher Performance: Evidence from DC Public Schools.” My impression is that in general school districts do a lousy job … Continue reading

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  1. RT @CharlesBarone: Schools could do a better job of picking good teachers with relatively little difficulty. HT @MrPABruno http://t.co/ogqs…

  2. RT @MrPABruno: “it seems that schools could do a better job of picking good teachers with relatively little difficulty” http://t.co/z3D5NjN…

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New Year’s reading

Recommended reading to start your new year: “Teacher Effects and Teacher-Related Policies” by Kirabo Jackson, Jonah Rockoff, and Douglas Staiger (available here). The authors offer a nice, and nicely nontechnical, summary of what we know about how much teachers affect student … Continue reading

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More on the American Statistical Association and value-added

Back in April I wrote about the American Statistical Association Statement on Using Value-Added Models. I wrote in part, Some of what the ASA says sounds ever-so-sensible, but reflects a failure to understand statistical models. Raj Chetty, John Friedman, and Jonah Rockoff … Continue reading

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Is value-added valuable?

Alert: half wonk, half not wonk. Last week I wrote about a new piece by Jesse Rothstein. Rothstein continued the argument that he’s been putting forth that value-added measures misstate teachers’ true contributions because they inadequately adjust for students’ learning … Continue reading

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Do value-added scores measure anything we care about?

Monday’s blog post ended saying “Chetty, Friedman, and Rockoff offer a pretty convincing case that teacher value-added scores really do measure the teacher’s contribution. The greater question is whether test score measure what we really care about.” The real question … Continue reading

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Is value-added unbiased?

Are value-added (VAM) estimates of teacher quality biased? “Biased” has specific technical meanings in statistics. VAM estimates would be biased if they were either too high or too low on average, or they would be biased if they were picking … Continue reading

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  1. Shelly says:

    These are very odd measures of “bias”. I’m assuming that for the first test, there’s a school fixed effect you haven’t mentioned? Otherwise, are we to believe that high-income districts don’t get better teachers? Even then, is variation in parent’s income within a school supposedly picking up aspects of student “goodness” not reflected in the students’ baseline test scores? Not sure what my prior is on that.

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Absent teachers and learning

Part of the commentary on the recent Chicago teacher strike pointed to evidence that students learn less when they don’t have teachers. Well, duh? Suppose that weren’t true–then why would we need teachers??? Mariesa Herrmann and Jonah Rockoff measure the … Continue reading

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Test cheating

Chetty, Friedman, and Rockoff (See last Monday) show that value-added scores contribute greatly to identifying good teachers. They also show that there is significant cheating on the standardized tests behind these measures. Specifically, the authors search for teachers whose students show … Continue reading

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Family background versus teacher contribution to learning

Do student test scores reflect teacher contributions or simply home and family background? The whole idea of using value-added measures is, of course, that by looking at the change in a student’s test score from one year to the next … Continue reading

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Are standardized tests good measures of what a good teacher does for her students?

Do you believe that standardized tests are good measures of what a good teacher does for her students? Nah, me either. Standardized tests have (at least) two problems. They test a very narrow set of skills. There’s so much more … Continue reading

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