Tag Archives: Education Next

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Leaving teaching

Here’s a chart originally published in the Connecticut Mirror and re-published in EducationNext. There are other occupations with higher turnover rates, but maybe not other professions.

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More on teacher evaluation in Chicago

In February, I wrote about an academic article by Matthew P. Steinberg and Lauren Sartain in which they reported on Chicago’s experiment in doing serious teacher evaluation. Steinberg and Sartain now have a semi-popular version of their work in EducationNext. The new version … Continue reading

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School spending and knowing what’s what

The 2014 Education Next poll posed the following question: Suppose the school spending were to be increased, would you favor reducing class size, increasing teacher salaries, or buying new books and technology. Then the clever pollsters asked the same question, this … Continue reading

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2 Responses to School spending and knowing what’s what

  1. Putting this together with your last post, it appears that private schools are taking advantage of rich uninformed parents to prioritize smaller class sizes.

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U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests

So I lifted the title of this post from the very nice piece over at Education Next. Recommended reading if you have a few minutes. If you have a few more minutes, you might want to go through the longer, … Continue reading

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NYC vouchers and poverty vs school quality

Mathew Chingos and Paul Peterson have a nice piece “The Impact of School Vouchers on College Enrollment” in Education Next where they look at the effects (in terms of later college attendance) of providing modest size vouchers to poor kids in New … Continue reading

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Might a bit of science lead to a political breakthrough?

Reformers want to change teaching quality with carrots (merit pay) and sticks (fire teachers with lousy evaluations). Teacher unions emphasize training and teacher support, and want all teachers to be treated identically. Okay…I oversimplify…but not by a whole lot. So … Continue reading

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Petrilli’s pondery

Mike Petrilli makes a point and raises a question about progress in teaching math in Education Next and Fordham’s Flypaper.  One of the great mysteries of modern-day school reform is why we’re seeing such strong progress (in math at least, … Continue reading

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2 Responses to Petrilli’s pondery

  1. Dick Startz says:

    Fair points. But applying ocular statistics to Petrilli’s graph it looks like the drop has been equal at higher percentiles. Maybe even greater. Without having thought through your math, wouldn’t that suggest a pretty minimal effect?

  2. Jesse Rothstein says:

    I don’t think we can dismiss the selection story so quickly. You have assumed that there is a perfect correlation between test scores and latent graduation propensities. But that can’t be right — my guess is that the correlation is relatively weak. That would mean that the effect of the changing selection would be spread throughout the distribution, not just at the very bottom. Combine that with a hypothesized rightward shift in the latent, unselected distribution and it seems to me that Petrilli’s figure could well be consistent with a selection story.

    I’m too lazy to take the idea to data, but it seems to me there are two ways to do it. First, you could assume that the latent 12th grade distribution shifted rightward by the same amount as was observed for the 8th grade distribution, and ask whether any feasible correlation between selection and test scores could generate the observed selected data in Petrilli’s figure. Second, you could use the NELS to estimate the correlation between test scores and continuation probabilities, then apply those to the changing selection seen in your second graph to estimate the trend in the unselected distribution.

    I don’t have any idea what either would show. My hunch is that selection will account for a meaningful portion, though not all, of the slowdown between 8th and 12th grades.

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Standing Lake Woebegon on its head

New York City has released teacher rankings. It’s about the stupidist situation since, well since Los Angeles released teacher rankings. Teachers should be rated and the ratings should be used. But conducting employee reviews in public is no way to … Continue reading

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Is the problem the bottom few?

Rick Hanushek has been arguing recently for focusing on the very least effective teachers. Hanushek has calculated that if we could replace a small number of the least effective teachers with average teachers it would make an enormous difference in … Continue reading

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  1. Pingback: Valuing Teachers - Julie BoydJulie Boyd

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Merit pay in name only

Did you get the press release from EducationNext titled “In the United States, Merit Pay Plans for Teachers are Few and Far Between?” I strongly advise you to read the whole report there, not just the press release. The headline is … Continue reading

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