Tag Archives: ed schools

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Are ed schools easy graders?

For a while now folks have been saying that ed schools are easy graders. Most of the evidence has come from looking at particular schools. But are ed schools as a whole easy graders?….Yeah, they are. I’ve put together a … Continue reading

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Colleges: ed students=>teachers

On average, only about half of students majoring in education end up as teachers (at least in the year after graduation). Do more selective colleges do a better job at producing students who end up actually teaching? Apparently, college selectivity … Continue reading

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Raising standards: Who else’s ox gets gored

Last week I looked at how CAEP’s proposed admission standards for students attending ed schools might effect different kinds of schools. Today, I’ve redone the analysis for colleges of different selectivity levels. Additionally I’ve asked what would happen if the final … Continue reading

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  1. Adam W. says:

    Might this just lead to more people skipping the ed major and opting for alternative certification?

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Raising standards: Whose ox gets gored?

CAEP is proposing to raise admission standards for students attending ed schools. A key provision requires schools to admit students whose SAT scores average in the top third. Meeting the new standard will be easy for some schools, less easy for … Continue reading

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CAEP accreditation draft standards and SAT

Before you read, consider this sentence an official wonk alert. I’ve been writing about the CAEP accreditation draft standards for ed schools. One thing CAEP sets out is that average test scores (SAT for example) for admitted students fall into … Continue reading

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New accreditation standards and GPA

Let’s continue last week’s discussion of the exciting new draft accreditation standards for teacher ed programs by looking at the effect of the GPA admission standard. (Thanks to my friends at NCTQ for a nudge on this one.) Nearly as … Continue reading

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  1. Sherman Dorn says:

    I suspect a number of colleges will use college GPA rather than high school GPA, for a number of reasons, among which are the ability to pass the gen-ed requirements with some margin over “skin of teeth.” Using college GPA would allow reasonable assessment of older students who come back to college or transfer from community colleges. For these students, high school grades and SATs are not going to be nearly as useful a threshold as performance in recently-completed college classes.

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Will ed schools cut enrollment 25 percent?

The Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) has new draft standards for accreditation intended to “raise the bar” on education schools. Standard 3.4 reads in part The provider ensures that the average GPA of its accepted cohort of candidates … Continue reading

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Teacher supply and demand

First some numbers. Then a bit of puzzlement. There are about 3.3 million public school teachers. The government projects that by 2021 we’ll have 3.7 million public school teachers. To include private school teachers, add on another 12 to 15 … Continue reading

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Teachers and SAT scores

Something I’ve tried to hammer on again and again is that we’re no longer drawing enough of the brightest students into teaching. Pure academic smarts is obviously not the only thing we need to see in a teacher. Plain normal-bright … Continue reading

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More teacher prep and value-added

How different are the products of different schools of education? In particular, are there measurable differences in the performance of students of teachers trained in one program when compared to students of teachers trained in another? Dan Goldhaber, Stephanie Liddle, and … Continue reading

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