Tag Archives: ed schools

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Ed degrees: bachelors vs masters

A quick picture of America’s annual production of new bachelor’s and master’s degree’s in education. The first thing to notice is that we’re giving out 40 percent more degrees than we did 20 years ago. The number of students has increased … Continue reading

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Preparing teachers

Look at this picture, just look at it! Richard Ingersoll and coauthors created this picture (except the red arrow, which is mine). So one out of five teachers begin their careers with no practice teaching…except for science teachers where it’s two … Continue reading

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  1. Dulce says:

    That does sound like a fantastic corsue and is something I missed out on by going the alt cert route. That’s why I think these conversations can be so fruitful. Clearly there is no prep program that is doing everything perfectly, but we can pick and choose what worked best from each one and build a model path from there.

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Ed school VAM

Teachers are central to quality education. Arguably, schools of education are central to quality teachers. The last six months have seen two enormous steps in evaluating schools of education: publication by US News of NCTQ’s rankings of teacher prep programs … Continue reading

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Accreditation, SAT scores, and differences among schools of ed

The new CAEP accreditation standards raise the bar on admission requirements for education schools. How much of an effect this will have on who gets in to ed schools depends in part on the differences in the applicant pools for … Continue reading

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  1. Peggy Farber says:

    Dick – I suspect you’ve given this to us already, but what is the ratio of low SAT schools/high SAT schools?

    • Dick Startz says:

      There is generic evidence that there are big differences across schools in SAT scores, but so far as I know there is no data at all for individual ed schools.

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Accreditation and SAT targets

The final CAEP accreditation standards are out and, perhaps not surprisingly, CAEP has slowed down implementation of higher SAT requirements for admission to schools of education. Here are the final standards for admitted applicants The group average performance on a national test, … Continue reading

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NCTQ State Stars

I’ve made a little map showing the average number of stars awarded by the NCTQ to ed schools in each state. This particular map shows stars for undergraduate training for both elementary and secondary school teachers. Green is a high score and red is … Continue reading

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Selectivity, accreditation, and the NCTQ report

A few weeks back I wrote about the possible effects of higher admission requirements for schools of education, such higher standards being part of the draft CAEP accreditation standard. If you were to look across ed schools, would you find … Continue reading

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Prediction

The U.S. News & World Report ratings of 1,000+ teacher ed programs–prepared courtesy of the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ)–are due out this week. Here are my predictions for the responses from schools of education. Schools rated highly: We … Continue reading

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Education majors, teachers, and race

America has a much higher proportion of minority students than it does minority teachers. I’ve taken a look at one particular part of this issue: are minority students who major in education less likely than white students to become teachers? (A … Continue reading

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Raising standards, SATs, and race

The draft accreditation standards for schools of education call for higher average SAT scores for teacher training programs. This raises an uncomfortable question about race. Students from racial minorities score lower on the SAT than do white students. Will the … Continue reading

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  1. Sigh. You really don’t think much about credentialing tests, do you?

    The Higher Education Act of 1998 or so made a change that resulted in all ed schools requiring that their candidates pass the credentialing tests before they enter the program. The credentialing pass rates are quite dismal. The ed schools can make whatever “adjustments” they like–of course, you do know that affirmative action is illegal in a few states, right?–but a degree is nothing without the credential, and the URM passing rates on the credential test are a bloodbath.

    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2012/07/23/radio-silence-on-clarence-mumford/
    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2012/11/28/more-on-mumford/

    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2013/03/31/its-the-tests-zitbrains/

    Read them all. Also, read Steven Sawchuk’s great piece: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/05/08/30entry_ep.h32.html?utm_source=fb&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mrss

  2. MrPABruno says:

    I think it’s notable that alt-cert programs seem to have more racial diversity.

    http://www.paul-bruno.com/why-are-some-credentialing-programs-more-racially-diverse-than-others/

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