Tag Archives: Cory Koedel

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Test measurement error measurement

Standardized tests all include measurement error. Never mind the hard conceptual questions of what we ought to be testing, standardized tests include error just because of the randomness of which question appears on a particular form and the like. Psychometricians … Continue reading

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Value-added and evaluating teacher preparation programs

The quality of teacher training programs and schools of education is a hot topic. (It’s going to get hotter when the folks at NCTQ release their national rankings.) I’ve thought that one incredibly important piece of objective evidence in evaluating … Continue reading

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  1. Jane Close Conoley says:

    As in any professional training endeavor the outcomes we get in teacher training are affected by how/whom we select, the experiences we offer during preparation, the situations novice teachers find themselves in during their beginning years, and the ongoing support we offer novices and practicing educators. On the ground, employers notice differences among programs in terms of novice teacher readiness to take the helm of a classroom. Translating these into snapshots of student achievement, however, is difficult. If teacher skills account for about 40% of variance in student achievement and teacher preparation accounts for ??% in teacher skills the actual effects of program on a single measure is quite likely to be small.

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Algebra pays

You may remember the kerfuffle a couple of weeks back following an (apparently serious) suggestion that we stop teaching algebra. Turns out there’s good evidence that math skills pay off in the job market. Cory Koedel and Eric Tyhurst took real … Continue reading

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  1. Bob Roseth says:

    I hate to think what the stereotypical member of my high school math club looked like and was thought of by his/her peers! Not a pretty picture. But maybe this is their revenge.

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Giving away the pension funds

Sometimes it’s the politics rather than the economics…but it still takes economists to point out what’s going on. During much of the 1990s pension funds did right well, following along with the stock market boom. Rather than keep the money … Continue reading

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Pension picture

Cory Koedel and Michael Podgursky have a new picture that shows some of the unintended consequences of our weird teacher pension system. The longer a teacher works the higher her pension, but the longer she has to wait before starting … Continue reading

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Pensions, retirements, and teacher quality

The way teacher pensions are structured, teachers have a big incentive to stay in the system mid-career followed by a notable incentive to bail later in their career. (The reason for the latter is that you can’t start collecting your … Continue reading

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Movin’ around–or not

Here’s one for your “law of unintended consequences” file. Koedel, Grissom, Ni, and Podgursky show that the way we’ve set up pension funds limits educator movement across districts–and that it’s a big effect. There are two kinds of pension setups: defined … Continue reading

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Spillovers in teaching

Does having a really good math teacher in secondary school improve a student’s reading scores? In a careful statistical study of students in San Diego, economist Cory Koedel found weak evidence of this sort of crossover effect. (Economists call these … Continue reading

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Schools of ed – making (up) the grade?

Schools of education are under attack by reformers for being part of the problem rather than part of the solution to our K-12 failings. And I can report, although this is based on casual empiricism rather than hard evidence, that … Continue reading

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