Tag Archives: Baccalaureate and Beyond

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Another look at salaries of education majors

The Baccalaureate and Beyond survey checked on 2012 salaries of students who graduated college in 2007-08. I’ve made a little graph comparing median salaries of education majors with others. Just one more way of seeing that¬†going into education ain’t financially … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Another look at salaries of education majors

Leave a Reply to MrPABruno Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Were teachers education majors?

What fraction of teachers were undergraduate education majors? I’d assumed that the answer was most, but not all. The Baccalaureate and Beyond data lets us look at students who graduated college in 2007-2008 and who were preK-12 teachers in 2012. … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | 1 Comment

One Response to Were teachers education majors?

Leave a Reply to MrPABruno Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Math pays outside teaching, not for teachers though

Teachers get paid for experience and credentials, but not for specific skills. Patrick Walsh explains that outside of K-12 education, both math and verbal skills get rewarded…but math skills get rewarded more. Unsurprisingly, people with more math skills are drawn … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Math pays outside teaching, not for teachers though

Leave a Reply to MrPABruno Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Teacher skills: math versus verbal

Patrick Walsh has taken data from Baccalaureate and Beyond to look at math versus verbal skills for teachers versus nonteachers. Next time I’ll talk about his results on how the teacher/nonteacher salary gap is different for people really good at … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Teacher skills: math versus verbal

Leave a Reply to MrPABruno Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Salaries by major

Prospective salaries aren’t the only reason for choosing a major in college, but I suspect pay matters–don’t you? And do you think students considering an education major can look forward to a nice salary? I’ve made a little chart showing … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply to MrPABruno Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

More on improving teacher SAT scores

A recent post discussed a study by Dan Goldhaber and Joe Walch showing that teacher SAT scores are improving. Education Realist posted an interesting comment arguing that part of what’s going on is a composition effect. The suggestion is that … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply to MrPABruno Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Education majors, teachers, and race

America has a much higher proportion of minority students than it does minority teachers. I’ve taken a look at one particular part of this issue: are¬†minority students who major in education less likely than white students to become teachers? (A … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply to MrPABruno Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Raising standards, GPAs, and race

The draft accreditation standards for schools of education call for higher average high school GPAs for teacher training programs, specifically that the average GPA should be 3.0 or better. Will raising this standard have a disparate impact on minority students? … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Raising standards, GPAs, and race

  1. GPAs are worthless, without a standardized test score to back them up. Majority minority schools (charter or urban comprehensive) produce transcripts with not even a passing resemblance to the reality of the education provided.

    If all ed schools do is require GPAs without an SAT/ACT score, it will just mean that teachers will be further pressured to give better grades to blacks and Hispanics. Meanwhile, whites and Asians with SAT/ACT scores a full standard deviation higher will be locked out because of an utterly moronic belief that GPAs have meanings.

    If you’re going to raise teacher “quality”–a foolish and probably misguided goal to begin with–then it’s got to be done with test scores, not grades.

    Not that any of this matters, because the blacks and Hispanics who are let in with low SAT scores will never be able to pass the credential tests.

    You really need to understand that ed school standards are ludicrously irrelevant. Right now, they require candidates to pass the credential test before being accepted. So long as that requirement doesn’t change, SAT scores and grades are meaningless.

Leave a Reply to MrPABruno Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Raising standards, SATs, and race

The draft accreditation standards for schools of education call for higher average SAT scores for teacher training programs. This raises an uncomfortable question about race. Students from racial minorities score lower on the SAT than do white students. Will the … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Raising standards, SATs, and race

  1. Sigh. You really don’t think much about credentialing tests, do you?

    The Higher Education Act of 1998 or so made a change that resulted in all ed schools requiring that their candidates pass the credentialing tests before they enter the program. The credentialing pass rates are quite dismal. The ed schools can make whatever “adjustments” they like–of course, you do know that affirmative action is illegal in a few states, right?–but a degree is nothing without the credential, and the URM passing rates on the credential test are a bloodbath.

    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2012/07/23/radio-silence-on-clarence-mumford/
    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2012/11/28/more-on-mumford/

    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2013/03/31/its-the-tests-zitbrains/

    Read them all. Also, read Steven Sawchuk’s great piece: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/05/08/30entry_ep.h32.html?utm_source=fb&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mrss

  2. MrPABruno says:

    I think it’s notable that alt-cert programs seem to have more racial diversity.

    http://www.paul-bruno.com/why-are-some-credentialing-programs-more-racially-diverse-than-others/

Leave a Reply to MrPABruno Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Are ed schools easy graders?

For a while now folks have been saying that ed schools are easy graders. Most of the evidence has come from looking at particular schools. But are ed schools as a whole easy graders?….Yeah, they are. I’ve put together a … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Are ed schools easy graders?

Leave a Reply to MrPABruno Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *