Tag Archives: accreditation

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Ed school VAM

Teachers are central to quality education. Arguably, schools of education are central to quality teachers. The last six months have seen two enormous steps in evaluating schools of education: publication by US News of NCTQ’s rankings of teacher prep programs … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Ed school VAM

Leave a Reply to Peggy Farber Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Accreditation, SAT scores, and differences among schools of ed

The new CAEP accreditation standards raise the bar on admission requirements for education schools. How much of an effect this will have on who gets in to ed schools depends in part on the differences in the applicant pools for … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Accreditation, SAT scores, and differences among schools of ed

  1. Peggy Farber says:

    Dick – I suspect you’ve given this to us already, but what is the ratio of low SAT schools/high SAT schools?

    • Dick Startz says:

      There is generic evidence that there are big differences across schools in SAT scores, but so far as I know there is no data at all for individual ed schools.

Leave a Reply to Peggy Farber Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Accreditation and SAT targets

The final CAEP accreditation standards are out and, perhaps not surprisingly, CAEP has slowed down implementation of higher SAT requirements for admission to schools of education. Here are the final standards for admitted applicants The group average performance on a national test, … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Accreditation and SAT targets

Leave a Reply to Peggy Farber Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Selectivity, accreditation, and the NCTQ report

A few weeks back I wrote about the possible effects of higher admission requirements for schools of education, such higher standards being part of the draft CAEP accreditation standard. If you were to look across ed schools, would you find … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply to Peggy Farber Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Raising standards, GPAs, and race

The draft accreditation standards for schools of education call for higher average high school GPAs for teacher training programs, specifically that the average GPA should be 3.0 or better. Will raising this standard have a disparate impact on minority students? … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Raising standards, GPAs, and race

  1. GPAs are worthless, without a standardized test score to back them up. Majority minority schools (charter or urban comprehensive) produce transcripts with not even a passing resemblance to the reality of the education provided.

    If all ed schools do is require GPAs without an SAT/ACT score, it will just mean that teachers will be further pressured to give better grades to blacks and Hispanics. Meanwhile, whites and Asians with SAT/ACT scores a full standard deviation higher will be locked out because of an utterly moronic belief that GPAs have meanings.

    If you’re going to raise teacher “quality”–a foolish and probably misguided goal to begin with–then it’s got to be done with test scores, not grades.

    Not that any of this matters, because the blacks and Hispanics who are let in with low SAT scores will never be able to pass the credential tests.

    You really need to understand that ed school standards are ludicrously irrelevant. Right now, they require candidates to pass the credential test before being accepted. So long as that requirement doesn’t change, SAT scores and grades are meaningless.

Leave a Reply to Peggy Farber Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Raising standards, SATs, and race

The draft accreditation standards for schools of education call for higher average SAT scores for teacher training programs. This raises an uncomfortable question about race. Students from racial minorities score lower on the SAT than do white students. Will the … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Raising standards, SATs, and race

  1. Sigh. You really don’t think much about credentialing tests, do you?

    The Higher Education Act of 1998 or so made a change that resulted in all ed schools requiring that their candidates pass the credentialing tests before they enter the program. The credentialing pass rates are quite dismal. The ed schools can make whatever “adjustments” they like–of course, you do know that affirmative action is illegal in a few states, right?–but a degree is nothing without the credential, and the URM passing rates on the credential test are a bloodbath.

    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2012/07/23/radio-silence-on-clarence-mumford/
    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2012/11/28/more-on-mumford/

    http://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2013/03/31/its-the-tests-zitbrains/

    Read them all. Also, read Steven Sawchuk’s great piece: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/05/08/30entry_ep.h32.html?utm_source=fb&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mrss

  2. MrPABruno says:

    I think it’s notable that alt-cert programs seem to have more racial diversity.

    http://www.paul-bruno.com/why-are-some-credentialing-programs-more-racially-diverse-than-others/

Leave a Reply to Peggy Farber Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Raising standards: Who else’s ox gets gored

Last week I looked at how CAEP’s proposed admission standards for students attending ed schools might effect different kinds of schools. Today, I’ve redone the analysis for colleges of different selectivity levels. Additionally I’ve asked what would happen if the final … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Raising standards: Who else’s ox gets gored

  1. Adam W. says:

    Might this just lead to more people skipping the ed major and opting for alternative certification?

Leave a Reply to Peggy Farber Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Raising standards: Whose ox gets gored?

CAEP is proposing to raise admission standards for students attending ed schools. A key provision requires schools to admit students whose SAT scores average in the top third. Meeting the new standard will be easy for some schools, less easy for … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Raising standards: Whose ox gets gored?

Leave a Reply to Peggy Farber Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CAEP accreditation draft standards and SAT

Before you read, consider this sentence an official wonk alert. I’ve been writing about the CAEP accreditation draft standards for ed schools. One thing CAEP sets out is that average test scores (SAT for example) for admitted students fall into … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to CAEP accreditation draft standards and SAT

Leave a Reply to Peggy Farber Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

New accreditation standards and GPA

Let’s continue last week’s discussion of the exciting new draft accreditation standards for teacher ed programs by looking at the effect of the GPA admission standard. (Thanks to my friends at NCTQ for a nudge on this one.) Nearly as … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to New accreditation standards and GPA

  1. Sherman Dorn says:

    I suspect a number of colleges will use college GPA rather than high school GPA, for a number of reasons, among which are the ability to pass the gen-ed requirements with some margin over “skin of teeth.” Using college GPA would allow reasonable assessment of older students who come back to college or transfer from community colleges. For these students, high school grades and SATs are not going to be nearly as useful a threshold as performance in recently-completed college classes.

Leave a Reply to Peggy Farber Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *