Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Author Archives: Dick Startz

Welcome to the Profit of Education website. Continuing the conversation begun in the book Profit of Education, we discuss the latest economic evidence on education reform.

Student teaching: Can we leverage the recent teacher “shortage” to students’ advantage?

Today’s post appeared in THE BROWN CENTER CHALKBOARD at the Brookings Institution. A possible teacher shortage has been much in the news—in California, for instance, the number of new credentials has fallen by about half since 2004, while K-12 enrollment stayed … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Summer!

ProfitOfEducation is going on break for the summer. Hope to see you back in the new school year!

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

College graduation

While this blog is mostly about K-12 education, some of the rhetoric you hear nowadays tends toward the idea that the goal of K-12 is “college readiness.” Regardless of whether you’re in agreement with “college readiness” as an over-riding goal, … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to College graduation

  1. MEMO says:

    High Schools already can and do keep these stats on the students that graduate. Most high schools use Naviance- and to keep stats on where the students apply, where they are accepted, what type of aid is offered, where the student finally accepts to attend , and they keep track of the student’s enrollment, major, credits taken each semester, etc… Most high schools do not reveal that they continue to monitor former students. And few , if any, ever ask permission from students or parents. The BULLY school mandate that kids fill out personality surveys, financial aid questions, parental bio- name, dates of birth, education, employer, etc.. the schools create accounts (like Google Mail, Google Education, College Board, Naviance) for the student to use and therefore own the date. Try to ask your high school who has access to the data, what exactly the privacy policies are, who owns the data, how is it stored, can it be deleted, or destroyed? The answers will make you sick.

  2. Nordy says:

    What do you think of the following: High schools should not only report how many of their students they send off to college; they should also report how many complete their degree.

    Would that really tell you anything about the education provided by the high school? My sense (would like to have hard data to back up), is that most college dropouts are due to external, non-academic factors. I don’t know that a high school should be held responsible if a former student is unable to pay bills, or develops a drinking problem.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Large districts

Here’s a factoid that I hadn’t known. Public school students are quite a bit more likely to attend school in a large school district than was true in the past. I’ve made a little chart showing the percentage of students … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Applicant Hiring vs Performance

I had the pleasure this week of hearing Jonah Rockoff talk about a paper he’s written with several colleagues, “Teacher Applicant Hiring and Teacher Performance: Evidence from DC Public Schools.” My impression is that in general school districts do a lousy job … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 8 Comments

8 Responses to Applicant Hiring vs Performance

  1. RT @CharlesBarone: Schools could do a better job of picking good teachers with relatively little difficulty. HT @MrPABruno http://t.co/ogqs…

  2. RT @MrPABruno: “it seems that schools could do a better job of picking good teachers with relatively little difficulty” http://t.co/z3D5NjN…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Why do private schools need so many new teachers?

Roughly 12 percent of teachers work in private schools. But more than twice that fraction of new teachers, 28 percent, work in private schools. (Numbers are from the Digest of Education Statistics. They’re probably not perfect, but I suspect they’re close.) Why … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Why do private schools need so many new teachers?

  1. “12% of teachers work in private schools…more than 2x that fraction of new teachers, 28%, work in private schools” http://t.co/eiLDYIpMev

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Teacher attrition

The Department of Education has a “First Look” study out, “Public School Teacher Attrition and Mobility in the First Five Years,” with somewhat surprising numbers on teacher attrition. (Thanks to NCTQ for the link.) The headline number is that only … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Performance of charter vs traditional public schools

Ladd, Clotfelter, and Holbein offer new measures comparing the performance of charter schools to traditional public schools in North Carolina. Here’s their picture for math. So charter schools used to be a little behind and now they perform more or less … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Performance of charter vs traditional public schools

  1. “neither a disaster nor a panacea” but charters seem to have improved over time relative to district schools (in NC). http://t.co/WfLmxxlDme

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

The demand for new teachers

The number of new teachers hired peaked just before the Great Recession. Hiring has since plummeted 25 percent. Government projections don’t suggest a huge rebound, and my guess is that the government numbers may be a smidgen high because government … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Does the district matter?

We’re all pretty sure that schools in some districts are better than those in other districts. There are resource differences and there are differences in who will be your kid’s companions. But it’s hard to prove that differences are due … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Does the district matter?

  1. @Tim_10_ber says:

    RT @MrPABruno: “My take is that parents who work to get their kids into better districts know what they’re doing.” http://t.co/1DX8OUPmwi

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *